Posts by Greg Weiss

Greg Weiss is a contributing writer for Luna Park whose poetry and reviews have appeared in Blue Fifth Review, Now Culture, The Columbia Review, The South Carolina Review, The Oklahoma Review, The Margie Review, The Southern Poetry Anthology: Mississippi, and elsewhere.



Print for Real

on 6×6 #2 and Artifice 2 The New York Times magazine recently switched to a new format, which both visually mimics an online magazine and, with the abundance of instances of “To learn more, visit the magazine online at…,” attempts to strongarm readers into thinking of the online and print editions of the magazine as

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Our Talk

from Matchbook #3 Our Talk lists of ambiguous pauses and jags plague us, mute women wag; blue rosehip, even rats and knives adore the scallops on your leaves.  

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Poetry & Aggression

on New York Quarterly 66 A couple months ago Nicole bought me two issues of the New York Quarterly, one from 1973 and the other from 1978. I had never read NYQ before, and found it sort of strangely likable. So when I say that I was surprised how much this issue resembled those older

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Conflict of Interest IV: Conclusions

My last three pieces have addressed some of the aesthetic results of the ever-increasing overlap between poetry readers and writers in relation to electronic and print journals. The first piece argued that there are more writers of poetry intended for a public audience than ever before, and that there are simultaneously more outlets for publication,

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Conflict of Interest Part III: Electronic Journals

The Internet is a vibrant scene in relation to literary journals: every couple weeks on Duotrope, a few journals fledge and a few go inactive. The question is what all of the vibrancy adds up to. In the same period that there seem to be fewer poetry readers and more poetry writers than ever before,

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Conflict of Interest Part II: Print Journals

While there are still plenty of print journals around, the ranks seem to be dwindling. While prestige-bias favoring print over electronic publication was/is tenacious, more and more print journals are going online. In addition, fledgling electronic journals are being started everyday, as the Internet allows anyone to start a journal at no or very little

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Conflict of Interest?

A friend of mine who teaches at the local university likes to say that he’s the only person in America who reads poetry but doesn’t write it. While he obviously overstates his point, the premise is correct: as a percentage of America’s general population, more and more people now write poetry intended for a public

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Strong Recommendations

Gulf Coast 22.1 is very good, particularly its prose. Unusually—at least in my experience—its two best prose pieces are supplied by its fiction and nonfiction contest-winners: Dana Kinstler and Kelly Blikre. Kinstler’s “Bird in My Throat” tells the story, from Ava’s, the wife’s, perspective, of a young, seemingly privileged 1960s couple who move down to

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Between Earnestness and Irony

Review of The Laurel Review, Vol. 43, No. 2 (Summer 2009) Previous to this issue, I last read The Laurel Review in 2000—Volume 34, Number 1. The Laurel Review has improved in the last nine years, or at least moved closer to my taste, but is still a bit too straitlaced, Raymond Carver earnest for

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Dismissing Africa

Notes on Witness Vol. XXII One of the many risks of Witness, “the magazine of the Black Mountain Institute,” presenting an issue dedicated to the theme of Dismissing Africa is that the very notion of dismissing “Africa” already dismisses the individuals who live in Africa. I don’t deny that this volume sometimes succumbs to the

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