Posts by Travis Kurowski

Travis Kurowski runs the Luna Park blog, among other things: traviskurowski.com.



Reissuing: How Jacket2 Is Saving Literary Magazine History

Danny Snelson and company have the most exciting ongoing digital archive project for literary magazines going on at Jacket2—titled, appropriately, Reissues. Reissues directly tackles the biggest problem in contemporary literary magazine readership and scholarship: historical access. A big problem with 20th century (read: pre-internet) literary magazines is access. Literary magazines reasonably strive to be both timely

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Bring the Noise

So Brooklyn Magazine—a quarterly covering art, culture, and lit out where the beautiful people live—said something nice about the Luna Park Twitter feed last week:   And I thought: well, damn. I hadn’t been really doing anything with the website for a while. I had this whole excuse: there was enough conversation about lit mags, I didn’t

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White Fiction

The new issue of Boston Review (July/August 2013) compelled me to write a bit here about it (the last time I wrote here was about Jake Adam York’s death in December)—and it particularly compelled me because of Jess Row’s essay “White Flights: Fiction’s Racial Landscape,” an insightful, balanced commentary about the place (and absence) of race

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Jake Adam York (1972-2012) and Superman

Yesterday poet Jake Adam York passed away after suffering a stroke. I didn’t know him. Like many, though, I read his poetry in the magazines. (I also remember seeing him introduce Michael Chabon at the Denver AWP Conference two years ago.) I probably knew his work less than most in the literary world (if there

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The Lit Mag Galley

Little Star—the only little magazine I know that sends a printed galley out for review. Bless you, Ann.

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The Economist Says Lit Mags Should Be Avoided

But, unless you’re Harold Bloom or something, don’t bring a literary magazine—that would be stupid. Here’s the beginning paragraph from a recent The Economist blog post about the launch of The American Reader comparing lit mags to, well, shit you don’t want to be putting your hands on: Short literary fiction and critical essays are the

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Beauty & Innovation In Online Publishing—Does It Have to Be One or the Other?

Daniel Roberts’s recently chose “12 of the Most Beautiful Literary Magazines Online” for Flavorwire. There are honestly some great picks here—Fiddleblack, Paper Darts, The Paris Review (of course)—but I can’t help notice that all the picks are doing pretty expected stuff when it comes to online reading. Not that that’s bad. Just to say, there’s

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Beer City or Lit City, USA?

I recently returned from Asheville, North Carolina, a quiet urban landscape nestled in the Blue Ridge Mountains and home to some of the nation’s best breweries. I visited nearly all of them, and also flipped through the first issue of Black Mountain Review (1954-57) at the Black Mountain College Museum. That’s an Instagram of it above.

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What Is a Magazine?—The Aspen Archive (1965-71)

Gwen Allen’s comprehensive 2011 book about the 20th century American art magazine, Artists’ Magazines: An Alternative Space for Art, devotes a chapter to Phyllis Johnson’s game-changing 1965-71 mixed-media art magazine, Aspen. I first ran into the magazine five years ago at the “Summer of Love: Art of the Psychedelic Era” exhibition at the Whitney Museum, a

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The Pulp Fiction Archive—The Magazines, Not the Movie

The Golden Gazette News offers up an interview with Patrick Scott Belk about The Pulp Magazines Project, his open-access all-fiction pulp magazine archive (1896-1946): During the 1930s—the decade which is generally considered the heyday, or the golden age, of pulp magazines—there were around 1,000 different pulp titles published. Some of these lasted for only a

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