Lit Mag History



Reissuing: How Jacket2 Is Saving Literary Magazine History

Danny Snelson and company have the most exciting ongoing digital archive project for literary magazines going on at Jacket2—titled, appropriately, Reissues. Reissues directly tackles the biggest problem in contemporary literary magazine readership and scholarship: historical access. A big problem with 20th century (read: pre-internet) literary magazines is access. Literary magazines reasonably strive to be both timely

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RIP, StoryTime Africa

I hadn’t been to StoryTime Africa‘s website in awhile, and after a recent visit I was saddened to see that it closed its doors last June. For five years, the online magazine published extremely engaging fiction from contemporary African writers.  From editor Ivor Hartmann’s goodbye letter: When I started StoryTime in 2007 it was partly in

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The Truth About TriQuarterly?

Gina Frangello’s recent “Lit-Link Round-up” post at The Rumpus is probably the most interesting—and detailed—thing written yet about the 2010 TriQuarterly transition from national print to student-run online publication: I briefly served as the faculty editor for TriQuarterly Online when the magazine was first transitioning from print.  Christ, that was a hot mess.  Susan Hahn and Ian Morris

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What Is a Magazine?—The Aspen Archive (1965-71)

Gwen Allen’s comprehensive 2011 book about the 20th century American art magazine, Artists’ Magazines: An Alternative Space for Art, devotes a chapter to Phyllis Johnson’s game-changing 1965-71 mixed-media art magazine, Aspen. I first ran into the magazine five years ago at the “Summer of Love: Art of the Psychedelic Era” exhibition at the Whitney Museum, a

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The Pulp Fiction Archive—The Magazines, Not the Movie

The Golden Gazette News offers up an interview with Patrick Scott Belk about The Pulp Magazines Project, his open-access all-fiction pulp magazine archive (1896-1946): During the 1930s—the decade which is generally considered the heyday, or the golden age, of pulp magazines—there were around 1,000 different pulp titles published. Some of these lasted for only a

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More Lit Mags & the CIA

To call Joel Whitney’s recent article at Salon on literary magazine connections to the CIA interesting is an understatement, but it’s maybe not interesting for reasons most readers would expect. Though connecting lit mags to the CIA—an organization with a questionable history that helped topple not a few governments—might seem like sensationalist news or a

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Plurality and Disorder Are the Key: n+1 and It’s Origins

It was OK to start with literature and art. As long as you said what you meant, and what you really thought on reflection (subject to later correction), then if you spoke honestly about anything you would be striking a blow. The magazine started with just $8,000, which four of us had pooled, plus $2,000

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30 Years of Frederick Barthelme & Mississippi Review

I worked at Mississippi Review for a year and a half in graduate school. Fiction writer Frederick Barthelme—Rick—was the editor of MR, and he was also my graduate school director down there in Hattiesburg, Mississippi. I am fairly certain the only reason Rick finally let me work on the magazine was because I pestered him

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Good News for the Mods

Some good news from Robert Scholes—lit mag scholar extraordinaire—over at the Modernist Journals Project: The Modernist Journals Project has been awarded a two-year grant of $270,000 from the National Endowment for the Humanities to digitize substantial runs of five American journals: McClure’s (1901-1910), The Smart Set (1913-1922), The Masses (1911-1917), Camera Work (1903-1917), and The Seven Arts (1916-1917). The

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Editing La Revue Blanche

Félix Vallotton painting of Félix Fénéon editing La Revue Blanche [The White Review]. 1896. Oil on cardboard. 52.5 cm. x 65 cm. Private collection.

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